Housing News Roundup: October 4, 2018 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: October 4, 2018

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New Map Links Childhood Neighborhood and Earnings

An interactive data tool released this week by the Census Bureau and Harvard University shows a strong association between where people are raised and their chances of climbing the economic ladder. Using data on children’s residences in 1978-1983, Raj Chetty and his colleagues found that if a person moves from a less affluent neighborhood to a more affluent neighborhood, the move increases lifetime earnings for low-income children by an average of $200,000. The researchers aim for the tool, which is the first to combine US Census Bureau and Internal Revenue Service data, to help policymakers develop new local solutions.

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Source: NPR

University Invests Millions in Homelessness Research

Portland State University president Rahmat Shoureshi announced Monday that he will dedicate $3 million to a new Homelessness Research and Action Collaborative and a Digital City Testbed Center to explore ways technology can make urban regions healthier and greener. The centers will have three years to attract outside investors and produce insights. The announcement comes as homelessness is ever present in the minds of Portlanders. The collaborative aims to show the Portland community how to talk about homelessness and look for solutions.

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Source: The Oregonian

Minneapolis Is in Desperate Need of Affordable Housing

The Metropolitan Council estimated that the Twin Cities region needed 52,000 new affordable housing units between 2011 and 2020, yet as of December 2017, only 7,000 were added. As rents rise and affordable properties age out of subsidies, the housing crisis is felt acutely by many. Twenty-year-old Aaron McLaurin has looked all over Minneapolis for a house or apartment but primarily is deterred because the income requirement is to earn two or three times the cost of rent. He hopes holding three jobs will qualify him to rent a unit.

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Source: Southwest Journal

Connecticut Community Colleges Will Offer Free Classes to Students Enrolled in SNAP

In partnership with the Connecticut Department of Social Services, Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU) is offering free classes to community college students enrolled in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). “We have many people who are hungry, who are homeless, and we have a responsibility to find ways to educate them so that they can provide for themselves and their families into the future,” said CSCU president Mark Ojakian.

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Source: NBC

How Dallas Is Addressing Housing Segregation

Is it more effective to invest in low-resource neighborhoods or more affluent areas that may provide more advantages? Dallas, Texas, is testing the latter theory to address a history of racial segregation and economic deprivation through a comprehensive housing policy that includes building 20,000 homes in preapproved areas considered prime for revitalization. According to a recent report, Dallas is the country’s least inclusive large city. The city hopes to change this by encouraging homebuying, rehabilitating existing homes, and promoting mixed-income housing. Among other strategies, the plan adapts zoning policies and uses city and federal money to offer tax incentives to developers.

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Source: Governing

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