Housing News Roundup: May 16, 2019 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: May 16, 2019

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Proposed Rule Could Displace More Than 55,000 Children, Says HUD Analysis

A US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) analysis suggests that a rule proposed by the Trump administration could displace more than 55,000 children who are legal US citizens or residents. The rule would limit undocumented immigrants’ access to federally subsidized housing by requiring every household member to be of “eligible immigration status.” HUD says it could affect children who legally qualify for the aid, most of whom live in California, New York, and Texas.

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Source: Washington Post

Middle-Income Seniors May Not Be Able to Afford Long-Term Care and Housing

In 2029, middle-income 75-to-84-year-olds likely will need $25,000 to $74,000 a year to cover long-term care costs, finds a recent Health Affairs analysis. More than 14 million people will fall into this middle-income category, nearly double the number today. But the study’s authors found that most will not be able to afford assisted living. “A lot of us are going to get stuck in this middle, and it’s pretty scary,” said David Grabowski, senior author and researcher at Harvard Medical School.

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Source: New York Times

Will Charlotte Eliminate Single-Family Zoning?

City planners in Charlotte, North Carolina, are considering eliminating single-family zoning to undo exclusionary policies that racially and economically segregated residents for decades. A 2013 study ranked Charlotte 50 out of 50 for upward mobility. “As this crisis begins to just combine to really just stifle livability, we have to look at different options to get out of it. So this is one of the tools in our toolbox,” said Charlotte planning director Taiwo Jaiyeoba. No formal proposals have come before the city council.

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Source: WFAE

DC Mayor Calls for More and Equitably Distributed Affordable Housing

Washington, DC, mayor Muriel Bowser issued a new order that calls for city agencies to identify strategies to create 12,000 affordable housing units by 2025. The Office of Planning will set “fair share targets” by September to create and preserve affordable housing so that there is “an equitable distribution of affordable housing across the District” by 2045. “This [order] makes it clear that we will take an all-eight-ward approach to affordable housing,” Bowser said late last week.

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Source: Greater Greater Washington

Many Teachers Can’t Afford Homeownership

Teachers can afford fewer than half of homes currently listed in 76 percent of major cities, according to new Trulia data. In San Jose, California, where the average teacher makes slightly less than $80,000, teachers can afford fewer than 1 percent of available listings. “While rates of housing cost burden among teachers are lower than the national average, they are higher than that of other Americans with college degrees, and in certain parts of the country—particularly the nation’s high-cost coastal metros—teachers are especially strained,” said Apartment List housing economist Chris Salvati.

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Source: Forbes

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