Housing News Roundup: March 21, 2019 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: March 21, 2019

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Study Finds That DC Has the Greatest Intensity of Gentrification

Washington, DC, has the highest “intensity of gentrification” of all cities in the country, according to a new study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC). Between 2000 and 2013, about 40 percent of the city’s low-income neighborhoods experienced gentrification. During this period, more than 20,000 African American residents were displaced primarily by an influx of white and affluent residents. “You feel it and you see it,” said Jesse Van Tol, NCRC’s chief executive.

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Source: Washington Post

County Health Rankings Highlight Impact of Housing on Health Outcomes

With more than 1 in 10 households across the United States spending over half their income on housing costs, this year’s County Health Rankings released by the University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation chose to focus on access to quality, affordable housing. Being severely burdened by housing costs reduces the amount families can spend on food, medicine, and other health-related necessities, and these housing challenges are most present in segregated communities.

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Source: Fast Company

Seattle Zoning Changes Include Affordable Housing Requirements

On Monday, Seattle’s city council approved zoning changes that will allow denser construction in 27 neighborhoods and will require developers to include apartments that are affordable to low-income residents in their buildings or face a fee. Officials estimate that the neighborhood upzones could generate up to 3,000 low-income units across the city over the next decade. Councilmember Sally Bagshaw said it is “a very important drop in the bucket.”

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Source: Seattle Times

How Equitable Is Access to Green Space in the United States?

Access to green areas, trees, and parks are associated with income, education, and race divides, according to a new study that examined 10 US metropolitan areas. The study found that income and higher education are positively and significantly associated with green space. Though the correlation is less significant, the research found that race is also a factor: shares of Latinx and African American residents are negatively associated with access to green space, while the share of white residents is positively associated with green space.

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Source: CityLab

In Charlotte, More Affordable Housing Could Reduce Student Homelessness

More than 29,000 children in North Carolina experienced homelessness in the 2016–2017 school year—roughly three-quarters of whom live doubled up with other families because their families cannot afford to live on their own. The Charlotte-Mecklenberg schools have the largest population of homeless students in the state. “Things like affordable housing and lack of access to livable wages, and other factors like interpartner violence and histories of eviction, play a big role in contributing to what we are seeing as family homelessness,” says Shantiqua Neely, executive director of an organization that serves families experiencing homelessness.

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Source: WFAE

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