Housing News Roundup: February 22, 2018 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: February 22, 2018

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Homelessness through the Eyes of NYC Families

In the 2017 fiscal year, homeless families stayed in New York City shelters an average of 414 days. 12,595 families with children entered shelters, and 8,571 families left. What did homelessness look like through the eyes of these families? Their journeys began with Prevention Assistance and Temporary Housing, involved months of waiting, and for lucky families, ended by leaving shelters and securing their own housing.

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Source: New York Times

No One Benefits from a Segregated Community

An Urban Institute study of the 100 most populated US regions found that no single racial group benefits from segregation, while integration benefits everyone. Less economically segregated areas tend to have a higher median household income among African Americans, and in areas where whites and Latinos integrated, everyone’s life expectancy was higher. Travis County judge Sarah Eckhardt said this speaks to the need for providing incentives for developers to build affordable housing in areas where they might not initially.

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Source: KUT

African American Women in Madison Are Most Vulnerable to Eviction

African American and female-headed households are among the groups most vulnerable to eviction in Dane County, Wisconsin, according to University of Wisconsin–Madison research. Brandice Hatcher was eight months pregnant and behind on rent because of health complications when she found an eviction notice on her door. Sabrina Madison, founder of the Progress Center for Black Women in Madison, says similar stories from other African American women in crisis are not uncommon. Women come to Madison when they don’t qualify for emergency rent assistance funds or when resources run out. “At this point, it’s really overwhelming,” she said.

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Source: The Capital Times

San Diego Voucher Holders Have the Opportunity for Greater Mobility

Effective January 1, low-income San Diego residents who receive housing vouchers can move into more expensive neighborhoods if they choose, as part of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Small Area Fair Market Rents program. Some say it could reduce their commute times, give them access to different schools, and integrate communities, while others like Rich Gentry, president and CEO of the San Diego Housing Commission, are wary of this new initiative. “We want to provide choice and mobility options for families who want to move, but on the other hand, we don’t want to predicate or force families,” he said.

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Source: San Diego Tribune

Starter Home Values are Rising Quickly

According to a report released by Zillow on Friday, starter home values have been rising faster than luxury properties for the past five years, and the supply of affordable houses is limited. This pattern benefits people who already own a home but hurts first-time buyers. Since the housing market crashed, “demand for less expensive, entry-level homes has built steadily, causing prices to grow rapidly,” said Zillow senior economist Aaron Terrazas.

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Source: Business Insider

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