Housing News Roundup: December 28, 2017 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: December 28, 2017

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How Will Tax Reform Affect Houston’s Fragile Affordable Housing Market?

In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, local leaders worry that a lower corporate tax rate and uncertain federal budget could make maintaining and building affordable housing more difficult in the city that already has a weak low-cost housing supply. “While the preservation of low-income housing tax credits and private activity bonds avoids an immediate devastating impact on affordable housing, this bill will exacerbate our country’s already yawning income inequality and will harm efforts to end homelessness and housing poverty,” said Diane Yentel, CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

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Source: Houston Chronicle

Low-Income Families Will Gain Greater Access to Better Neighborhoods

A federal judge ordered the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to implement a 2016 rule that would give low-income families receiving public rental assistance greater access to more affluent neighborhoods with greater opportunities. It’s about the right to choose where to live and the right not to be segregated. Good housing policy does not confine families to high poverty neighborhoods,” said Philip Tegeler, president and executive director of the Poverty & Race Research Action Council.

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Source: Washington Post

Tiny Homes to House the Bay Area’s Homeless

In one of the most expensive housing markets in the country, tiny homes and stackable modular units are being planned in San Francisco, Berkeley, Oakland, and other Bay Area cities to house the homeless. San Francisco officials have already moved forward with plans to build 500 units, which can be assembled in less than a year and are less expensive to build than traditional supportive housing. “We’re always interested in finding ways to do supportive housing faster and cheaper,” said Jeff Kositsky, head of the city Department on Homelessness and Supportive Housing.

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Source: San Francisco Chronicle

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