Housing News Roundup: May 21, 2015 | How Housing Matters
News Roundup

Housing News Roundup: May 21, 2015

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Boston on Track Toward Ambitious Housing Goals

Boston’s new housing production, including for low- and middle-income households, has surpassed targets and is mostly on track to meet the city’s 2030 goals, according to a new report from the mayor’s office. Between January 2011 and March 2015, the city of Boston issued permits for more than 13,000 new apartments, condos and homes, which surpassed the goal of 10,200 the mayor had set for that time period. Of those new homes, 1,538 are affordable for low-income workers and 1,039 are reserved for middle-income residents. Market-rate units aimed at the middle-income market have fallen short of the goal however. Permits have been issued for 2,719 such units — nearly 700 short of the March 31 target.

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Source: Boston Globe

Troubling Questions about Displacement

A New York Magazine excerpt from The Edge Becomes the Center, a book of oral history about gentrification, suggests that racial discrimination is deeply connected with displacement by one anonymously-quoted Brooklyn developer. The developer describes a strategy of paying existing black tenants to leave and then renting to new tenants who are all white. According to the author, this case, while isolated, demonstrates the need for a larger conversation about whether and how often existing residents are being displaced by the “market forces” of gentrification rather than illegal actions.

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Source: Next City

‘Come Home NYC’ Helps Families Move from Homeless Shelters to Homes

In New York City, thousands of low-wage residents earn enough money to pay rent yet live in homeless shelters because they don’t meet the credit and income requirements of many landlords. Enterprise Community Partners’ Come Home NYC program will receive an additional $1.2 million from the New York Attorney General’s office and $300,000 from the Robin Hood Foundation to move up to 300 families out of shelters and into affordable housing. The program’s approach includes housing placement and insurance to landlords.

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Source: Wall Street Journal

Advocates Call for Market-Rate Housing Moratorium in Bay Area

A group of community advocates in San Francisco are fighting for a moratorium on market-rate housing development in the Mission and Bayview neighborhoods. The Board of Supervisors will vote on the Mission moratorium proposal next month. The group plans to rally to persuade the supervisor representing Bayview to vote in favor of the proposal and introduce a similar plan for Bayview.

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Source: San Francisco Examiner

New Boston Project Combines Housing for the Homeless and Onsite Medical Care

A $14 million affordable housing and medical care facility for homeless people is set to be completed in 2015 and be fully occupied next year. The Boston-area development will have 30 apartments and onsite facilities that offer health care, job training, home budgeting, case management and crisis intervention. There will also be a 20-bed outpatient clinic.

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Source: Boston Herald

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