Housing News Roundup: March 2, 2015 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: March 2, 2015

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Poverty is Rising in Inner Suburbs, and Schools Have Trouble Keeping Up

Rapidly changing demographics are making it difficult for school districts to adapt to the needs of students. A new report found that as city centers become more educated and affluent, poverty is rising throughout inner suburbs. “This is the new reality in America,” said Joshua P. Starr, a former superintendent of the Montgomery County (Md.) school system. “There are municipalities that are going to have to work harder to meet the needs of a different population of kids and families than were there before.”

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Source: Washington Post

Google Looks to Add Affordable Housing to Development Plans

As major tech companies face continued public frustration over their contribution to an increase in California’s overall cost of living — including a spike in housing — Google is expected to announce new affordable housing units as part of a proposed $200 million community benefits package. LinkedIn also submitted plans for its mixed-use campus just last week.

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Source: Silicon Valley Business Journal

4 Ways to Help Pull Children out of Poverty

Raising housing subsidies for poor families is one of four potential tactics laid out in a recent CNN op-ed that takes on the issues of child poverty in America. A 2015 Children’s Defense Fund report outlined how boosting federal subsidies could reduce U.S. child poverty by 20.8% — or 2.3 million kids. “Child poverty isn’t inevitable. It’s a choice. And we can choose to end it.”

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Source: CNN

Austin Wants to Add Affordable Housing — But Where?

The City of Austin is dedicated to improve its affordable housing situation in part through the addition or renovation of 3,500 units across six affordable housing projects. However, in a city experiencing gentrification across the field, the question is where to build them — and NIMBY is rearing its head. “The working class, and particularly, the African-American working-class population, and to some extent, the Hispanic population, have been pushed out into the first-ring suburbs,” said John Henneberger, the co-director of the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service.

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Source: Next City

Measuring Segregation by Neighbors, Not Just Neighborhoods

New analysis of old Census data shows the persistence of racial segregation in the United States. The researchers, Trevon Logan and John Parman, used 1880 and 1940 Census records to compare the reported race for each household and its neighbors, rather than looking at demographics at the neighborhood scale. This new way to measure segregation can be used for present and historic purposes and allows a more complete picture of both urban and rural segregation patterns. The new analysis shows that, contrary to prior findings, racial segregation increased both in the urban North and in the rural South during the Great Migration.

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Source: CityLab

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