Housing News Roundup: June 16, 2016 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: June 16, 2016

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Streetcar Opens Doors for Affordable Housing in Tucson

Two years after the addition of a streetcar line, the Arizona Department of Housing has awarded low income housing tax credits to three affordable housing developments in Tucson. Affordable housing developments in the city previously had little chance of receiving the tax credits due to the state’s prioritization of transit-oriented sites. “We’re starting to see a little bit of movement in affordable housing, which is so needed here,” says Sally Stang, director of Tucson’s housing department.

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Source: Arizona Daily Star

New Research on the Harms of Childhood Moves

According to research recently published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, moving during childhood is connected with an increase likelihood of problematic adult behaviors and outcomes, including suicide attempts, drug abuse, and violent criminal activity. The study relied on data on the Danish population born between 1971 and 1997. Negative outcomes were more likely if the child moved during early adolescence or if moved multiple times over the course of a year. All of the moves included in the study were across municipal borders, which suggests a dual residential and school move.

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Source: Washington Post

Does Segregation Harm Metro Areas Economically?

A debate in Chicago about the cost of meeting affordable housing requirements on-site sparked new research by the Metropolitan Planning Council (MPC) and the Urban Institute. Is the status quo of residential segregation by race and income harming local and metropolitan economies? Early findings suggest the existence of separate residential experiences for Chicago’s middle-class families by race. The researchers hope to identify policy changes that can reduce segregation. “There’s been a fair amount of research that economies suffer, that even middle- and upper-income families pay a price if economic segregation slows down regional growth,” says Marisa Novara, a director at MPC.

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Source: Next City

Rankings Suggest Rarity of Combined Metro Area Strengths

The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis has ranked the largest 100 metropolitan areas in the United States on their economic strength, housing affordability, and quality of life. Based on market theory, the presence of all three factors in an area should be rare. The rankings confirm this, with no metropolitan areas ranking in the top 20 across all three indicators and just eight metropolitan areas ranking in the top half for all three.

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Source: Builder

A School Boundary Battle and Dismantling School Segregation

At the height of U.S. school desegregation, test scores for both black and white students rose and the achievement gap by race narrowed. The achievement gap has grown in the decades since, following the elimination of federal funds for school desegregation and Supreme Court rulings barring the use of race as a factor in children’s school assignments. Within this context, Nikole Hannah-Jones writes of her decision to send her daughter to a Brooklyn public school serving a majority black and Latino low-income population, and of the neighborhood battle when a nearby majority-white school’s boundaries were redrawn to eliminate overcrowding.

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Source: New York Times Magazine

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