Housing News Roundup: July 14, 2015 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: July 14, 2015

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Bill de Blasio Sets 25 Year Housing Record in NYC

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration has built or preserved 20,325 affordable-housing units in the past year, a 25-year record for the city. That includes more than 8,000 new construction starts and saving more than 11,000 units from demolition. Long-term plans call for building or preserving 200,000 units in the next ten years.

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Source: New York Daily News

SoHo Ranked Among the Most Expensive ZIP Codes in the U.S.

New York City is one of the nation’s most expensive places to live, and new data show how a particularly high-cost New York City neighborhood compares with the nation. The average home in the United States costs around $179,000, while the average home in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood costs almost $3 million, making it one of the priciest ZIP Codes in the country. Richard Florida, an American urban studies theorist, and his colleague Charlotta Mellander from the Martin Prosperity Institute, compiled data from Zillow’s Home Value Index to determine how many homes a person could buy in different areas of the country for the price of one SoHo apartment. For example, a person in Memphis could buy 38 homes for the price of one SoHo apartment.

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Source: CityLab

In Philly, a Dose of Window Repair Leads to Crime Reduction

In 2011, Philadelphia released an ordinance that required owners of abandoned buildings to maintain working doors and windows on their properties. Two years later, Philly neighborhoods are seeing a reduction in crime. A team of researchers from the U.S. Forest Service, the University of Pennsylvania and Yale compared crime rates around compliant buildings and noncompliant buildings. They found that in the same two-year period, the compliant buildings experienced an average of eight fewer assaults, 10 fewer gun assaults and five fewer nuisance crimes. This study is the first to provide empirical evidence linking building maintenance and crime.

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Source: Next City

Lead Poisoning: A Public Health Crisis for African-Americans

Children of color whose families are poor and live in housing built before 1950 have the highest risk of lead poisoning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In fact, black children are 1.6 times more likely than white children to have high blood-lead levels. Despite this, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill to cut $35 million out of the U.S. Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes budget. These budget cuts will have a significant impact on cities such as Detroit which rely heavily on federal funding to combat their lead problem.

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Source: Huffington Post

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