Housing News Roundup: February 24, 2015 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: February 24, 2015

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What’s a Normal ‘Middle Class Job’? It May Surprise You

The traditional “middle class job” has changed since 1980, as has the type of people who work them, with women seeing greater access to higher salaries, according to a new infographic. A middle class salary is defined as $40,000-$80,000 in 2014 dollars. Registered nurses and other specialty occupations have seen their share of middle class wages increase the most since 1980, while construction and other blue-collar jobs have seen the greatest declines

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Source: New York Times

Young, Educated Professionals Also Need "Obtainable" Housing Options

Often when people think about “affordable housing” their mind goes to the needs of people working low-wage jobs, such as those in the service industry. However, a new report finds that young, educated professionals can also face difficulty finding an affordable place to live. Nashville, for example, maybe be developing areas that appeal to young professionals, but they simply can’t afford the “hefty price tags.”

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Source: Nashville Tennessean

New Proposal Would Encourage Banks to Invest in Energy-Efficiency for Low-Income Homes and Schools

A new proposal could bring cost savings to low-income families by allowing banks to receive Community Reinvestment Act credits when they invest in energy efficiency in low-income communities. Such a change could also be a significant benefit to public schools in low-income areas, by supporting investment that reduces schools’ core operating expenses.

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Source: The Hill

Large but Varying Gaps in Child Opportunities in U.S. Communities

Minority children are disproportionately likely to live in unhealthy neighborhoods, according to an interactive tool based on the “Child Opportunity Index.” The tool weaves together indicators associated with child development along with neighborhood demographic data. Gaps in opportunities vary greatly from place to place, with opportunity gaps the largest in Albany and Boston.

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Source: City Lab

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