Housing News Roundup: April 2, 2015 | How Housing Matters

Housing News Roundup: April 2, 2015

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Philadelphia Bike Share Program to Appeal to Low-Income Areas

Philadelphia will put one third of the 600 bicycles in its planned bike share program in low-income neighborhoods in order to encourage the use of the inexpensive transit program. In addition, users will be able to pay with cash if they do not have a credit card. “Our bike share will be accessible to underserved communities from day one,” said Carniesha Fenwick-Kwashie, grant manager of the Mayor’s Fund for Philadelphia. Approximately 27% of the city’s 1.6 million residents live below the poverty line.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Source: Co.EXIST

A New Analysis of the Nation’s Working Poor

Income inequality also includes a racial and ethnic divide. While minorities account for 40% of all working families, they also account for 58% of all low-income working families, according to an analysis of U.S. Census data by the Working Poor Families Project. According to the head of the national initiative, the disparity is “weakening society, reducing economic competitiveness, defying American values and challenging state governments to take more steps to heal the economic divide.”

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Source: Huffington Post

In Boston, Where You Call Home Says a Lot About Your Health

There’s a simple way to get a fairly accurate first impression of a Boston resident’s health: Ask where they live. A recent analysis found that neighborhoods along the city’s T line can be close together when it comes to physical proximity, but far apart when it comes to health. The state of health is especially bleak for Boston’s Hispanic children, according to the new “Child Opportunity Index”, which found that 58% of the city’s Hispanic youth live in areas with the lowest level of access to “healthy development resources.” The index was developed by researchers at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management and Ohio State University’s Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Source: Boston Public Radio

D.C. Makes a Play Against Gentrification

In what many observers see as a push back against gentrification, the Washington, D.C., zoning commission is reducing the maximum height of single-family row houses from 40 feet to 35 feet. District neighborhoods such as Columbia Heights, Shaw and Capitol Hill are increasingly seeing developers adding up to two floors on top of existing home as a way to eke out additional residential space.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Source: Next City

Where Pregnant Women Live Has Lasting Health Impacts for Their Children

Where we live can affect us even before we’re born. Prenatal environmental factors such as air pollution — even in small amounts — can impact both early life and long-term health. Housing subsidies that enable low-income pregnant women to move to healthier communities with less pollution and greater access to supportive services can help lead to improved health outcomes.

ShareShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Source: The Economist

Add a Comment

Add a Comment

Advanced Options

Filter Search:
Month
Day
Year
Events Calendar
Filter Search:
Month
Day
Year
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
Thursday, April 8, 2014
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

Please select year

OK
X